Skip to main content

Full text of "The rose garden of Omar Khayyam : founded on the Persian"

See other formats


P K 

6516 

re ; 

■ rii! . 

1 ' ■ ' .' 


• 




. 






Glass > \-'k\ : : 

Book - I Q 

Copyright^ 

COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



The ROSE GARDEN 



OF 



OMAR KHAYYAM 



Founded on the Persian 



EBEN FRANCIS THOMPSON 




PRIVATELY PRINTED 
MCMX 



A 



\fi 



1*> 



copyright i9io 

By Eben Francis Thompson 

yf// right? reserved 



The Commonwealth Press 
Worcester, Mass. 



©GI.A2592 



7 . ; 



INTRODUCTION 

Omar Khayyam has been generally regarded as a 
materialist and atheist. This view is wide of the 
truth, for while he railed at formalism in religion 
and at the broadening of phylacteries, there is ample 
evidence in his writings of his belief in the one God 
and in a future state. Like nearly all Persian poets, 
Omar hymned the Grape and like many of them he 
makes it a too frequently recurring theme. It is 
evident, however, that many of the poems in praise 
of wine attributed to him are spurious and while one 
may not follow the contention of M. Nicolas who 
claims that all our poet's allusions to wine are to be 
interpreted in a mystical sense as referring to deity and 
the contemplation of the divine, it is doubtless true 
that many of them can be interpreted rightly in no 
other way. It is equally evident that very many 
refer to the literal Grape and it is their frequency 
that gives color to the charge that Omar was a sot 
as well as a scoffer. We are not called upon to con- 
sider at length this last indictment except to remark 
in passing that Omar's long life and eminent career 

in 



INTRODUCTION 

as a busy man of science would seem to negative the 
suggestion that he was deep in dissipation. His in- 
tellectual keenness and audacity led him to a frankness 
that was quite unconventional, and we may well say 
with Fitz Gerald that "he bragg'd more than he 
drank of it." 

It is inevitable that a man of so many sides and of 
such accomplishment should have been, like Shake- 
speare, variously regarded. The varying interpreta- 
tions, literal or mystical, applied to his writings, his 
keen power of mockery, his capacity in the mere 
statement of a proposition which he contested, of 
hanging his doubt or refutation thereon, contributed 
to this result. For in addition to the above views 
of him he has been deemed a free thinker; a man 
of science; a bon vivant; a devout and orthodox 
Mussulman; a railer at religion and morality; a pes- 
simist; a serene epicure absorbed in the pleasures of 
the present and claimed by materialist and Sufi alike. 
All of which goes to show, if it shows anything, the 
greatness and universality of Omar's real nature. 
Doubtless if the old Persian were now permitted to 
characterize himself, he would use the formula of 
Bottom as applied to Snug the joiner, in the role of 
Lion, "I am a man as other men are." 

For it is after all the human quality, the spirit of 
good fellowship that pervades most of his writings, 
no less than Omar's intellectual acuteness and modern- 

IV 



INTRODUCTION 

ity that has given him a place unique in literature. 
In here offering what I believe to be the essence 
of Omar's thought as shown in his principal du- 
baitat, I hope to aid in the correction of some popular 
errors concerning Omar the man and his Philosophy, 
for while it appears that like most Orientals he was a 
fatalist, he was no materialist, and while scoffing at 
the unreason of certain dogmas and mocking the 
apotheosis of the unessential, he was imbued with 
the poet's love of the beautiful, a profound reverence 
for the Infinite and a keen joy in Nature, a conviction 
of the littleness and utter impuissance of man, " the 
shadow of a shade," as compared to Divine might, and 
lastly with a deep, abiding faith in the goodness of a 
great and merciful God, however worshipped or 
designated. 

Worcester, Massachusetts, 
November 20, 1909. 



v 



THE ROSE GARDEN 
OF OMAR KHAYYAM 

At the beginning of our twelfth century the 
fame of Hakim Omar Khayyam, Persian Astrono- 
mer Royal, Philosopher and Poet, known as the 
"King of the Wise," had spread throughout the 
Middle East. Omar at that time was living in 
retirement at Nishapiir. To him came Hasan 
Mulai 'bn Ali of Meshed, a young student who 
had been deeply impressed by some of Omar's du- 
baitat which he had read in MSS. or which he 
had heard recited at various times. To use his own 
phrase they "had been written upon the tablets of 
his heart." Fired with youthful enthusiasm Hasan 
resolved to journey from Meshed to Nishapiir to pay 
his respects to the master and to learn more of 
Omar's Philosophy. To this end bringing letters 
Hasan sought out Omar's house in the suburbs of 
Nishapiir and presented himself. 

Omar who shrunk from publicity, consistently 

VII 



following his own teachings in this regard, had been 
averse to receiving pupils but he was so touched by 
Hasan's devotion and moved by the urgency of his 
letters, that he received the young man graciously 
and with simple hospitality, and after rest and re- 
freshment Jed him to the small garden which em- 
bowered ^iis dwelling. There seated by the side 
of a small stream and under the shade of a chenar 
tree over which climbed vines of the rose and 
grape, master and student looked out upon the 
domes and towers of Nishapur. 

Responding to Hasan's request and in accordance 
with the custom Omar discoursed to his pupil and 
recited the following chaharbaitat, in part improvised, 
and dealing with the problems of Life and Death, 
Fortune and Destiny, Love and Divinity and em- 
bodying the essence of his Philosophy. 



VIII 



The Rose Garden of Omar Khayyam 

i 
When Allah first set Heaven's swift coursers free 
And hung on high Parwin and Mushtari, 
Our lot was fixed in Destiny's divan; 
Then why blame us for what the Fates decree? 

2 

From circling Heaven a Voice addrest my Soul, 

" Learn now what Fate hath graved upon the Scroll ; 

" Long since I'd freed myself from dizziness, 
If I my own revolving could control!" 



"Parwin and Mushtari," 
The Pleiades and Jupiter. 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

3 
"The Good and Evil in man's mortal mould, 
The Joy and Grief that Fate and Fortune hold, 
Impute not to these skies, for reasoned well, 
More helpless they than thou a thousand fold ! " 

4 
" For Heaven's decrees upon the Scroll remain 
As at the first; unheeding Bliss or Bane 

The Pen hath writ whate'er the Fates ordain; 
To grieve or to resist is all in vain! ,, 

5 
And my Soul sought in her extremity 
The Pen and Tablet, Heaven and Hell to see, 

At length the Master wisely said to me, 
"Pen, Tablet, Heaven and Hell are all in thee!" 



6 

'Tis dawn, Arise! O source of grace and drain 
The brimming bowl and sound the zittern's strain ! 
For those who sleep like thee not long remain 
And they who ve gone will ne'er come back again ! 

2 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

• 

7 
For shields are naught, by Death's sharp arrows prest, 
And honors naught, silver and gold possest ; 

As far as I view worldly things, I see 
Goodness alone is good and naught the rest. 

8 
See! Day hath rent Night's sable veil in twain! 
Rejoice thy soul, the draught of Morning drain ! 
O drink Beloved, for many a Dawn will turn 
With wistful face to find us — but in vain ! 



9 
And where is one of all who went before 
Returned the Long Road's Secret to tell o'er? 

Ah, hoard not treasure in your House of Life 
For when once gone you will return no more ! 

io 
For Heaven that makes to none its secrets plain, 
Hath myriads like Mahmiid and Ayaz slain; 

This borrowed moment at this transient Inn, 
O Love, full oft we '11 seek nor find again ! 

3 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

1 1 
This wheeling Heaven which we amazed discern, 
Is but a circling lantern, we should learn, 

The sun the candle and the world the shade, 
And we the flitting forms that on it turn. 

12 
The myriad stars that swarm in yonder skies, 
Occasion much conjecture to the wise; 

See you lose not the end of Wisdom's thread, 
For those who lead are dizzied with surmise. 

J 3 

The lights that now the roof of Heaven adorn, 
That come and go and back with Earth are borne, 
Now in Earth's pouch, now on Heaven's broid- 
ered skirt, 
While Allah lives shall aye anew be born. 

And yonder golden bowl and vault of blue 
Full oft have rolled and will the ages through ; 

And so too we, impelled by turning Fate, 
Like others come and go like others, too. 

4 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

\ l S 

And long the world will last when gone are we, 
Without a name or trace of thee or me ; 

Before, we were not — and there was no void! — 
And after, when we 're gone the same 'twill be ! 

16 

Who launched the Sun in gleaming gold arrayed, 
Or what can wreck Earth's base thus firmly laid, 

By Learning's touchstone ne'er will be assayed, 
Nor ever in Conjecture's scales be weighed ! 



J 7 
Live while you may, you 're not like grass, 't is plain, 
Which when 'tis cut down springeth up amain; 
Nor are you gold O heedless one! that when 
Once hid in earth they '11 dig you up again ! 

18 
And if you prosper, it is not your deed, 
Nor all your blame if you do not succeed ; 

Whate'er you do is in the hand of Fate, 
Which nor your striving nor your prayers doth heed. 

5 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

19 

Then knock not at each door upon your way, 
With earthly good and ill contented stay ; 

Whate'er the number on Fate's dice that fall 
From Fortune's cup, that number you must play ! 

20 
In truth, for 't is no idle simile, 
Heaven plays the game and its mere puppets we, 
Moved on Life's Chess-board, one by one, and 
tossed 
Into the Chess-box of Nonenity ! 

21 
Even as the tulip lifts her chalice, so 
Sitting with some fair Tulip Cheeks, do thou, 

And gladly drink life's cup till it please Heaven 
Swiftly with whirlwind stroke to lay thee low. 

22 
And yet the thought of death brings me no fear, 
That World than this to me hath more of cheer ; 
I deem life but a loan which God hath made, 
And I '11 repay it when the time is here. 

6 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

2 3 
When in the mould my clay was mixed of old, 
With it God mingled evils manifold, 

Better than what I am I cannot be, 
For as I am He poured me in the mould. 

And if His pearl of service I ne'er thread, 

Nor yet have wiped Sin's dust from off my head. 

For all this of His mercy I have hope, 
Because that "One is Two!" I ne'er have said. 



25 

And since time hath no bound, be of good cheer, 
The stars will spangle still the heavenly sphere ; 

With bricks from your dismantled house of clay, 
Walls for another's dwelling, men will rear. 

26 
Let not- your soul in Sorrow's clasp be prest, 
Nor let your days be filled with vain unrest; 

The book, the loved one's lips and marge of mead 
Forsake not till Earth fold you in her breast. 
7 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

27 
Like drop in mighty stream like desert blast, 
Another day from our lives flieth fast, 

Yet there are two days that I reck not of, 
The day to come and that already past. 



28 
Then grieve not over buried Yesterday, 
Nor let unborn To-morrow's cares dismay, 
Reckless of Past or Future live serene, 
Nor to the winds a lifetime cast away. 



29 
Life's Caravan moves on in mystery, 
Seize then the joyous moments as they fly; 

Why fret lest that To-morrow take thy friends, 
Bring forth the cup for Night is hastening by. 



3° 
Ah Love! how long with body that doth tire, 
To trace the world with eager foot aspire? 

All things that come and pass, depart and go, 
And not one moment suiteth thy desire. 

8 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

3 1 
Since worldly truth is but illusion vain, 
Why so distressed O Love, in grief and pain ? 

Submit to Fate! What once the Pen hath writ 
It ne'er will blot or write for thee again. 

3 2 
And do not think a single fear have I 
To leave this earth, that thence my soul should fly ; 
Since Death will come, his touch I do not dread, 
1 T is my ill living makes me fear to die ! 



33 
A jar of wine, a book of poesy, 
A loaf of bread, enough for life give me, 

Then sitting in some quiet nook with thee 
Were sweeter than the Sultan's empery ! 



34 
And he who is of half a loaf possest, 
Himself to shelter hath a little nest 

Who slaves for none nor is by any served, 
Let him be glad for he hath this world's best! 

9 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

35 
And so far as you can, cause no one pain, 

Lest any you inflame your wrath restrain ; 

And if eternal peace be your desire, 

Though vexed, from wronging any man refrain. 



36 

And since in this harsh world man's gain hath been 
Only his soul's vexation and chagrin, 

Happy is he who quickly flees this world, 
And he who never came hath joy serene. 



37 
Those strong in virtue and of learning deep, 
Who for their fellows beacon lights would keep, 

Have found no way out of this darksome night, 
But told their tales and got them back to sleep ! 

38 

And since hand never reached the longed-for goal, 
Nor to its full desire attains the soul, 

Give me a glass and go, for Heaven ne'er poured 
An unmixed cup from yonder turquoise bowl ! 

10 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

39 
What though the tent of blue that spans us o'er 
Be pitched, Khayyam, and closed Discussion's door, 

The Everlasting Saki in Life's bowl 
Millions of bubbles like Khayyam doth pour ! 

40 
The swarming myriads in the struggle vie, 
Distraught by pleasures, strife and luxury, 

They drained Life's cup and silent in the earth 
Wrapt in the Sleep of Naught together lie ! 

4i 
Long in that dreamless slumber they will stay, 
Question and answer free till Judgment Day ; 

How long "None from the dead brings news!" 
wilt say ? 
What news should any bring since naught know they? 

42 
And since the world doth tend to sadden thee 
And from thy body soon the soul will flee, 

Ere verdure from thine ashes springeth up 
These few days on the green rest cheerfully. 
11 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

43 
For now Spring's joyousness o'er earth prevails, 
And each glad heart the fields with yearning hails, 
The boughs with flowers gleam white as Moses' 
hand, 
And every zephyr Jesus' sigh exhales! 

44 
Lo ! where'er blooms a rose or tulip bed, 
From some kings blood it takes its hue of red, 
Yea, every violet seems like Beauty's mole 
Sprung from the dust of some once lovely maid ! 

45 
And Zephyr rends the rose's robe in twain, 
Her beauty bulbuls praise in joyous strain, 

Sit 'neath this rose tree's shade for many a rose 
Wind strewn in earth hath turned to earth again. 

4 6 

Then drink ere doth your name from earth depart, 
For Cares take flight when wine hath reached the 
heart, 
And loose the loved one's tresses knot by knot, 
Before the knots that bind your limbs do part. 

12 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

47 
O fools, the world's allurements do not buy 
Since ye know her conditions certainly; 

Your precious lifetime give not to the winds, 
Rejoice your soul and to the loved one fly ! 

4 8 

For somewhere hid within the heavenly vast 
A cup that all must drink in turn is placed; 

Sigh not when your time comes but gladly drink 
For then it is your turn the cup to taste ! 

49 
For every thing whether 't is old or new, 
Will in its turn its end attain unto ; 

And this base world abides with none for aye, 
They pass and others come and follow, too. 



5° 
And unto you, an adept, let me say 
What man hath always been, a shape of clay, 

The clay of grief cast in the mould of toil, 
Who, tasting life a moment, goes his way ! 

13 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

5 1 
And do you ask what is this life so vain ? 
'T were long and hard the mystery to explain; 

'T is but a breath borne from an unknown sea 
And then blown back to that same sea again ! 

5 2 
Thy being from Another's doth proceed, 
Another's passion doth thy passion breed; 

Go and within Thought's collar draw thy head, 
For by thy hand Another's hand is hid ! 



53 
Yon sky is but a vault 'neath which are pent 
Our waning lives in toil and trouble spent; 

Hell is a fire kindled by useless fret, 
Heaven but a single instant of content ! 



54 
A sot croucht in the desert I did see, 
Belief nor Doubt, nor Goods nor Creed had he, 
Nor God nor Truth nor Law nor Certainty; 
Where in two worlds is like audacity ? 

14 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

55 
Ten powers, Nine spheres, Eight heavens He first 

unrolled ; 
And planets Seven of Six sides then inscrolled; 

From senses Five, Four elements, Three souls, God 
In Two worlds, Man, like thee but ONE did mould ! 
^^^♦♦^♦♦^ 

56 

In yonder palace that to heaven towered high, 

Where forehead bowed to threshold, Kings did lie; 

I saw a dove that on its battlements 

Thus "Koo, koo, koo?" "Where are they now?" 

did cry! 

57 
Once King Bahrain held nightly revels there 

Where wolves now prowl or lions make their lair, 

How oft Bahrain's noose caught his nimble prey! 

Yet see, how Death Bahrain doth fast ensnare ! 

And I heard on the battlement of Tiis 
A bird address the skull of King Kaius, 

"Alas!" moaned she, "Where sound thy martial 
bells?" 
"Where the alarums of thy drums profuse?" 
15 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

59 
There in his shop a potter I did greet 
And saw the master, foot on wheel, complete 

Covers and handles for his pots and jars 
From heads of long dead kings and beggars' feet! 

60 
"Stop!" I cried "Potter, let thy hand be stayed !" 
"How long wilt thou the clay of man degrade?" 
"Of what think'st thou, thus setting on thy 
wheel 
"Firidun's heart and mighty Khusrau's head?" 



61 
Still o'er his task the potter worked alone, 
Trampling the clay, unmoved; in mystic tone 

The clod cried out to him "Be gentle, pray 
For thou like me wilt be much trampled on!" 



62 
"For once yon vase a hapless lover pined, 
In snares of Beauty's tresses oft confined; 

This handle on its neck was once an arm 
That oft around the loved one's neck entwined!" 

16 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

63 
"The thorn that bends 'neath every creature's tread 
May spring from some love's curl, fair brow of maid, 

And every palace tile may once have been 
Some Vizier's hand or mighty Sultan's head!" 

64 

And then methought "Each mote on earth ere now 
Once formed some sunlit cheek or Venus brow; 

Brush the dust gently from thy loved one's face 
For that was once love's cheek and ringlet, too ! " 

65 

For He who did the earth and heavens array 
Full many a scar on grieving hearts doth lay, 

And many a ruby lip and musky tress 
Hath buried in earth's treasure chest of clay. 

66 
And though fine steeds, rich jewels, arms of war 
Thou hast, boast not this ten day fortune, for 

None bears away his life from Heaven's wrath, 
Which breaks the mug to-day — next day, the jar ! 

17 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

67 
Lament not, then, the world's inconstancy, 
Be glad an instant, seize joy ere it flee! 

If aught were constant in this shifting world 
The turn from others had not come to thee. 

68 
' T is but a crumbling caravanserai, 
Where watch in turn its warders, Night and Day; 

The palace where a thousand Jamsheds sat; 
The tomb wherein a thousand Bahrams lay ! 

69 

Up from Earth's center e'en to Saturn's throne 
I solved all problems of the heavenly zone 

And leaped out freed from bonds of fraud and 
lies, 
Yea, loosened every knot save Death's alone ! 

7° 
How long of mosque lamp or of incense tell? 
How long of Heaven's rewards or pains of Hell? 
See, from all time "What is to be, will be!" 
Thy Master, Fate, did on the Tablet spell. 

18 






OMAR KHAYYAM 

7 1 
The revellers who of old wine drink deep, 
And they who in the prayer niche vigil keep, 
None, none is on dry land, but all at sea ! 
ONE only wakes, the rest are sunk in sleep ! 



72 
The framework of the cup God did unite, 
To break in wrath why should He deem it right ? 

Those fine and comely models of Himself! 
Shaped by what love and broke in what despite ! 



73 
And howe'er much at Fate's hand thou dost smart, 
Oppressed by Heaven however grieved at heart, 

Beware lest of pure water from base hands 
A drop wet thy lip, though afire thou art ! 



74 
A corner and two loaves our choice we 've made, 
Earth's pomp and vanity aside we 've laid ; 

We have bought poverty with heart and soul 
And find we've gained great riches by the trade. 

19 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

75 
Ah, Love ! seek not kind rule from Destiny ! 
Nor from Time's changes high or rich to be ! 

Striv'st thou to ease thy pain ? It doth increase, 
Bear suffering and seek no remedy ! 



7 6 

O Beauty's Lamp ! by stream and verdant plain 
Rejoice thy soul and sound the zittern's strain ! 

Live blithely, for the murmuring water saith, 
" Lo, when I 've gone I come not back again!" 

77 
When first Eternal Love my being wrought 
Love's lesson ever to my soul was taught, 

And then of my heart's dust was made a key 
To ope the treasures of immortal thought. 

78 

Out on that heart wherein love hath no sway, 
Nor to some charmer's witchery a prey ; 

The day that thou dost pass devoid of love, 
For thee is none more wasted than that day. 

20 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

79 
Yet merely worldly love no true worth shows, 
Like fire half dead, with little warmth it glows ; 
True love is his who months, years, day and 
night, 
Recks not of sleep nor food, ease nor repose. 

80 
Love is chief volume in the world of thought ; 
The burden of youth's song with love is fraught ; 

Learn then this point, that life in truth is love, 
O thou, who of the world of love know'st naught. 

81 
And he who toward his fellows love doth bear, 
Whether to mosque or church he doth repair, 

Hath his name written in the Book of Love 
And gives to Heaven or Hell no thought or care. 

82 
To banish from one grieving heart its pain 
Were more worth than an empire to sustain ; 
And better than to free a thousand slaves 
To bind one freeman in Love's tender chain. 
21 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

83 
Yet in this world none gains a rose-cheeked fair 
Ere in his heart, fate driven, the thorn he wear; 

Till this comb suffered many a cruel cleft 
It never could have touched the loved one's hair! 



84 

What time my heart with youthful ardor wrought, 
Few of Life's secrets were unknown, methought, 

But now grown old in pondering, I find 
My knowledge is as if the known were naught. 

85 

I sought all lore the sages could bestow, 

And thought I knew all that there was to know ; 

But hear the sum of everything I learned, 
"We come like water and like wind we go!" 

86 
Closed is the volume of my youthful day, 
And this fresh spring-time gladness gone for aye; 

O youth, thou joyous bird ! ah ! I knew not 
When here you came nor when you flew away ! 

22 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

87 
O, Lord, though limitless the sins I do 
Against myself, the soul and body too, 

'T is that I have entire faith in Thee, 
If sinning I repent and sin anew ! 

88 
And what I am, I am by Thy decree, 
For threescore years Thy grace hath fostered me; 
For threescore more I still would sin, to learn 
If my sin greater or Thy clemency. 



A thousand snares Thou settest in my way 
And threatenest, if I fall therein, to slay ; 

Thou mak'st Thy law and call'st me rebel, 
though 
The world is free in no wise from Thy sway ! 

90 
The world's astir and mad in quest of Thee, 
Bare before Thee stand wealth and poverty ; 

To all Thou speakest but each ear is deaf, 
With all art present but no eye can see ! 

23 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

9 1 
Open ! Thou Opener of doors, I pray ! 
And since Thou art my Guide show me Thy way ! 

I'll not give hand to other hand-takers, 
All fleeting they, but Thou abid'st for aye ! 



92 
And though creeds two and seventy there be, 
The first of creeds, I hold, is love of Thee ; 

Forms and obedience, doubt and sin are naught, 
Thou 'rt all my aim, the rest be far from me ! 

93 
Then mercy on this captive heart bestow, 
Pity this bosom overcome with woe, 

O pardon this my hand that grasps the cup, 
And these my feet that to the tavern go ! 

94 
For better there that I commune with Thee 
Than far from Thee in mosques feign piety ; 

O Thou of all created First and Last, 
If Thou wilt, burn, if Thou wilt, cherish me ! 

24 






OMAR KHAYYAM 

95 
For what I feel toward Thee I would make plain, 
And that I will abridge in verses twain; 

" For love of Thee I '11 lay me in the dust 
That Thy dear love may raise me up again!" 

9 6 

Though sometimes hid Thou show'st Thy face to 

none 
Again Thou dost existent forms put on ; 

This splendor to Thyself Thou dost reveal, 
Thou art Spectator, Spectacle in ONE! 

97 
My highest wisdom Thy cause ne'er hath known, 
And my thought turns in prayer to Thee alone ! 

I know Thy nature is most wonderful 
And baffles mortal wit, since 't is Thine own ! 

98 

My service naught augments Thy majesty, 
And my past sin abateth naught from Thee ; 

Then pardon and withold not, since I know 
Thou 'rt slow to wrath and swift in clemency ! 

25 



THE ROSE GARDEN OF 

99 
From doubt to certainty is but a breath, 
A breath from infidelity to faith ; 

Ah, cherish then this precious breath and learn 
Life's sum is but a breath from birth to death. 



ioo 
For once I prest the cup, for I did yearn 
Life's secret riddle in its depths to learn 

And pressing lip to lip, it murmured low 
"Drink! for to this world you will ne'er return!" 

IOI 

And when hath come for me the final day 
And freed from dross my soul hath winged her way, 
How oft from yon blue dome the moon's soft 
beams 
Shall gild the grasses springing from my clay ! 

102 
O comrades ! when ye meet as ye agree 
Ye needs must pledge your friend in memory ; 

And when O Saki, on thy joyous round 
My time shall come, turn down a glass for me ! 

26 



OMAR KHAYYAM 

103 
Ah, Love ! were thine all worldly wealth and power, 
Thy garden decked with Pleasure's vine and flower ; 

' T were all like dew upon the grass at night 
Resting — and vanished in the morning hour ! 

104 

Thou who all men's secret thoughts dost know, 
In case of need who succor dost bestow, 

O, Lord give me repentance and forgive, 
Thou from whom penitence and pardon flow ! 

io 5 
My body's life and all my strength Thou art ! 
My heart and soul are Thine, O Soul and Heart ! 

Thou art my being and completely mine ! 
And I 'm all Thine, since I 'm of Thee a part ! 

106 

1 'm wearied, Lord, at this low state of mine, 
And at my empty-handedness repine; 

Since life Thou mak'st from naught, bring me 
from naught 
Into Thine own Existence, made divine ! 

Tamam shud. 

27 



One copy del. to Cat. Div. 



IC 




LIBRARY OF CONGRESS • 

028 940 906 3